TWO PORTLY GENTLEMEN

In October of 1843, Charles Dickens began writing one of the English languages most beloved stories. What began as his attempt to supplement his family’s meager income has in excess of 170 years, become cherished by many with its tale of special spirits, warmth to others and much of the byproduct of Christmas.

One of my favorite scenes is the oft overlooked part in Chapter One where the “two portly gentlemen” are let into the miser’s counting house by his employee, Bob Cratchit. They engage Mr. Scrooge to solicit resources for the poor and destitute. He summarily does not like the entreaty and presses them on their perspective. I wonder: what are the legal implications of their presence in his office that fictitious night? The laws impacting the scene if it occurred today could include: premises liability (what if one slip and fell?); propriety of their solicitation (were they registered with the State? would the donation be tax deductible?); agency (did the employee have the right to let them in?); trespassing (Scrooge would argue it.); hostile work environment we would need to ask Bob Cratchit); employment (was Bob an “at will” employee, independent contractor or salaried under contract?); fraud (were the two guys honorable at all or something akin to the IRS phone scammers we have today?); and the list goes on.

As we consider our lives and how they are impacted by an almost innumerable number of regulations and laws (state, federal and international), we can know well that life can be a complex bag of rules, tensions, met and unmet expectations. I hope this Christmas season we can all understand in our heart of hearts the question put forth by the two portly gentlemen from the pen of Charles Dickens. “A few of us are endeavoring to raise a fund to buy the Poor some meat and drink, and means of warmth. We choose this time, because it is a time, of all others, when Want is keenly felt, and Abundance rejoices. What shall I put you down for?”